Geoscientists reconstruct 'eye-opening' 900-year Northeast climate record - Phys.org
Phys.org - Wed 9 Jan 21:54 GMT

Geoscientists reconstruct 'eye-opening' 900-year Northeast climate record - Phys.org

Deploying a new technique for the first time in the region, geoscientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have reconstructed the longest and highest-resolution climate record for the Northeastern United States, which reveals previously undetected p…

  As Miller explains, they used a relatively new quantitative method based on the presence of chemical compounds known as branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetra ethers (branched GDGTs) found in lakes, soils, rivers and peat bogs around the world.

  Miller says, "This is the first effort using these compounds to reconstruct temperature in the Northeast, and the first one at this resolution."

  An independent terrestrial paleo-thermometer that relies on measuring two byproducts of processes carried out in branched GDGTs in lake sediment, a method first introduced two decades ago by researchers in The Netherlands, offered a promising alternative, Miller says.

  Miller and colleagues say this project enjoyed notable support from many quarters, including the UMass Amherst Alumni Association supporting student field work and data collection in Maine; the geology department at Bates College; funding from the U.S. Geological Survey; and at UMass Amherst, sophisticated biogeochemistry laboratory equipment and the Joe Hartshorn Memorial Award from the geosciences department, and other assistance from the Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center.

  Explore further: Study sheds light on why a warmer world may equal a wetter Arctic More information: Daniel R. Miller et al, A 900-year New England temperature reconstruction from in situ seasonally produced branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (brGDGTs), Climate of the Past (2018).